Almost there

As I write this, there are just 35 hours left on the Village by the Sea kickstarter drive.

We’re at $5,390 of the $4,000 goal, so now Lily’s cooking up tasty, nutritious stretch goals:

Stephen Blackmoore (CITY OF THE LOST, DEAD THINGS (Feb – 2013), KHAN OF MARS (2013) and Will Hindmarch (Thackery T. Lambshead Cabinet of Curiosities, The Escapist, Don’t Read This Book) want to join us in the village. And they each want to tell us a story.

If we can hit $5,500, these two stories will appear in an ebook together, for backers only, $5 and up. Blackmoore and Hindmarch are in a class all their own: their stories will help lay the foundation for some of your sweetest nightmares about the Village by the Sea.

Hear that? Just $110 more and we *ALL* get treats. Plus extra monies go toward funding more art and more pages in the guide. So spread the word!

And in case the meaning of the $200 backer prize isn’t clear:

 Founding Family: All Pillar of the Community benefits, plus inclusion in and copy of the Village by the Sea Founding Families Tree.
That’s a place in a family tree that I’m being commissioned to illustrate! :3 Your name. In my art. And I promise it’s going to be elaborate and Victorian and oh so unsettling.Enticed?
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Horror games and the Sea

Village of the Sea, city seal

It’s the last week of this incredible Kickstarter drive, and I had to share it. Not just because I’m involved, but because it’s really everything I could ever hope for as the RPG-and-horror-and-mystery-and-non-neurotypical loving geek that I am. Seriously. If there were dragons and a subsection about Pacific Northwest birds this would cover about all of my biggest passions.

Excerpt from the guide:

I like writing about beautiful, horrible things. The Village by the Sea is a beautiful, horrible place. And I want to take you there.

The Guide covers neighborhoods, families and coverups and over a hundred years of history, for a town that exists outside of time and place. This could be the town you stopped in as a child on your way to see family. It might be your hometown. This could even be the town just down the road from yours.

The Village by the Sea was founded on the coast in 1850. Its founding families still exert force on the course of Village history, its borders have crept over devoured nearby settlements, and its piers are washed in blood. The monuments to dead sailors cast shadows in the park. There are always new missing posters outside the market.

There is never a year without a candlelit vigil for the dead.

I’ve got the village in my blood. I may not be nice all the time, and days of cutesie teen detective work are long behind me. I may have issues, but letting people die isn’t usually one of them. I came back here because I didn’t have a choice, and writing the guide is all I have left.

-“The Guide to the Village by the Sea,” Ashley Hart

And watch the video. I think Lillian does a pretty awesome job of saying it all: Coastal small town horror themed tabletop RPG with a mystery subplot involving a synesthetic detective? And Lillian Cohen-Moore is masterminding it? And Lisa Grabenstetter’s doing art for it?

Just about perfect, amiright? I am. You want a copy, and it’s only $5 for the bottom level. Go on!

As of my writing this, they’ve fulfilled their funding goal and are formulating amazing new stretch goals to fulfill. This can only get better and better.

*{I have this new job (as a patent illustrator), so please forgive my reticence on here while I get settled in!}

 

Back to business

Hey, you may have heard about that derecho storm the eastern half of the US experienced the other night! We were pretty lucky here in Annapolis, in that I don’t believe there were any deaths or major injuries (except to trees). There was a fair bit of property damage (none to mine) and quite a few people lost power (including me). The worst was probably the heat index of 105F+ on Sunday, which didn’t combine well with lack of electricity.

The power just came back on early this morning, after about 76 hours without. Really grateful to have the AC and internet back. Also grateful to not have to look forward to another evening of reading by oil lamp (there are cons as well as pros to oil lamps, and the cons multiply the longer you have to use them).

Evan and I were up late when the storm hit and had the opportunity to watch it arrive. The night was perfectly still and quiet, almost oppressively so, though the lamps in our room had been flickering intermittently. Then a wall of wind abruptly hit the trees with speed and force akin to a massive train, causing them to whip back and forth violently. It brought copious amounts of thunder and almost constant flickerings of white and purple lightning with it, and sheets of rain.

Normally our huge, damaging storms come from the opposite direction and give us a little bit more warning. Time enough to panic and hoard bottled water and city-provided sandbags. Thanks, derecho.

(I think we actually experienced a fair bit more damage than the much-dreaded hurricane Irene produced last year. Though there wasn’t really any flooding this time, which was a nice change of pace).